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Hurricane Names for 2020 Storm Season

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Hurricanes and tropical storms aren't given names to make these disastrous storms seem friendlier. Storms are given names to make them easier to remember. But who picks the names?

Prior to the 1950s, meteorologists kept track of hurricanes and tropical storms by the year and the storms’ order for that year. So, for instance, the fifth tropical storm of 1938 was referred to as just that — the “fifth tropical storm of 1938” or “Storm 5.” 

Tropical storms and hurricanes that did a lot of damage received unofficial names—like the 1926 Great Miami Hurricane, which did so much damage that the Miami government implemented the first known building code in the United States.

During the 1950s, meteorologists realized that it was difficult to keep track of unnamed storms—particularly if there was more than one storm happening at any given time. By 1953, meteorologists around the United States were using names for tropical storms and cyclones. 

In those days, the storm names were all female. Both male and female names were used for Northern Pacific storms in 1978, and by 1979, male and female names were being used for Atlantic storms, too.

The World Meteorological Organization is responsible for developing the names for both Northern Pacific and Atlantic storms. They use six lists of names for Atlantic Ocean and Eastern North Pacific storms. These lists rotate, one each year.

That means every six years, the names cycle back around and get reused (which happened in 2019). If a hurricane does tremendous damage, such as Katrina, Sandy, or Harvey, the name is retired and replaced by a different name beginning with the same letter (After 2019, Dorian will most likely be added to the list of retired names). 

The names alternate between male and female names, listed alphabetically and in chronological order starting with A and omitting Q and U, X, Y, and Z.  If more than 21 names are required during a season, the Greek alphabet is used. 

Tropical Storms vs. Hurricanes

The National Hurricane Center explains that names are only given to tropical storms that have sustained wind speeds higher than 39 mph. These names will stay with the storm as it reaches hurricane strength (maximum sustained winds of 74 mph or higher). This means Tropical Storm Debby, for example, will become Hurricane Debby if it reaches maturity.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1st, peaks September 10th, and ends November 30th, although hurricanes can form at any time. 

List of 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Names:

These names were recycled from the 2014 season. Did your name make the list? 

2020 Hurricane Names 

  1. Arthur
  2. Bertha
  3. Cristobal
  4. Dolly
  5. Edouard
  6. Fay
  7. Gonzalo
  8. Hanna
  9. Isaias
  10. Josephine
  11. Kyle
  12. Laura
  13. Marco
  14. Nana
  15. Omar
  16. Paulette
  17. Rene
  18. Sally
  19. Teddy
  20. Vicky
  21. Wilfred
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The Florida Solar Rights Act is a law that forbids any entity—including homeowner associations—from prohibiting the installation of solar or other renewable energy devices on Florida buildings.

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Finally, any requirement(s) that a system be screened from view by trees, fences, ground mounting racks, or a remote roof location that is hidden from the street, will generally violate the statute.

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